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dc.contributor.authorAune, Marthe
dc.contributor.authorRøed, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-26T09:10:33Z
dc.date.available2012-04-26T09:10:33Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/94855
dc.descriptionMasteroppgave(MSc) in Master of Science in Leadership and Organizational Psychology - Handelshøyskolen BI, 2012
dc.description.abstractThis
study
explores
the
effects
of
forced
ranking,
conceptualized
as
a
summative,
norm‐referenced
form
of
feedback,
on
performance.
It
was
hypothesized
that
the
lower
ranked
individuals
would
demonstrate
less
performance
improvement
than
the
higher
ranked
individuals
after
receiving
feedback.
The
results
were
opposite
as
hypothesized,
with
higher
ranked
individuals
performing
worse
compared
to
lower
ranked
individuals.
These
results
are
explained
and
discussed
in
light
of
both
earlier
and
more
recent
feedback
theories.
To
further
investigate
the
effects
of
forced
ranking,
three
mediating
variables
were
included.
The
first
mediating
variable,
intrinsic
motivation,
had
only
a
marginally
significant
effect
on
performance.
Forced
ranking
also
failed
to
reach
statistical
significance
on
intrinsic
motivation,
and
mediation
is
therefore
not
supported.
The
second
and
third
mediating
variables
were
distributive
and
procedural
justice.
Forced
ranking
did
not
achieve
a
significant
effect
on
these
variables.
The
effect
of
distributive‐
and
procedural
justice
on
performance
did
not
produce
significant
results
either,
which
rejects
the
mediation
hypotheses.
Nonetheless,
post
hoc
interaction
analyses
discovered
a
significant
interaction
effect
of
procedural
justice
on
the
relationship
between
forced
ranking
and
performance;
participants
with
lower
perceptions
of
procedural
justice
performed
better
than
those
with
higher
perceptions,
and
this
effect
was
the
most
pronounced
when
higher
ranked.
A
possible
explanation
for
this
rather
unconventional
finding
is
discussed,
together
with
explanations
and
discussions
of
the
insignificant
and
significant
findings
of
all
variables.


In
sum,
some
of
the
propositions
of
feedback
theory
are
supported
by
this
study,
and
the
facilitating
tendency
of
intrinsic
motivation
on
performance
is
to
some
degree
further
established.
Nevertheless,
in
order
to
sort
out
of
the
effects
of
forced
ranking
on
performance
and
other
work‐related
variables,
more
research
is
clearly
needed.no_NO
dc.language.isoengno_NO
dc.subjectledelse organisasjonspsykologi leadership organizational psychology
dc.titleForced ranking : friend or foe? : on forced ranking and its effect on intrinsic motivation, justice perceptions and performanceno_NO
dc.typeMaster thesisno_NO


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