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dc.contributor.authorYang, Canchao
dc.contributor.authorWang, Longwu
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Shun-Jen
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Yu-Cheng
dc.contributor.authorStokke, Bård Gunnar
dc.contributor.authorRøskaft, Eivin
dc.contributor.authorMoksnes, Arne
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Wei
dc.contributor.authorMøller, Anders Pape
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-25T13:11:45Z
dc.date.available2017-10-25T13:11:45Z
dc.date.created2014-10-09T12:51:07Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationBehavioral Ecology. 2015, 26 (2), 406-415.nb_NO
dc.identifier.issn1045-2249
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2462156
dc.description.abstractDifferent populations of a host species subject to variable patterns of selection due to cuckoo parasitism provide an optimal situation for studying natural selection and coevolution in action. We compared egg appearance and egg-rejection behavior of 2 common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) hosts, the ashy-throated parrotbill (Paradoxornis alphonsianus) and the vinous-throated parrotbill (Paradoxornis webbianus) between mainland China and Taiwan population that have been segregated for 2–3 million years. Avian visual modeling showed that the mainland host population under strong selection from brood parasitism has evolved polymorphic eggs, while the island host population released from brood parasitism has maintained the original monomorphic egg phenotype. Furthermore, experiments indicated that under such long historical segregation, egg rejection in the island population decayed dramatically in the absence of cuckoo parasitism. This study provides strong evidence that egg-rejection ability can be dramatically deficient in host populations without brood parasitism compared to parasitized ones. The results further enhance our understanding of changes in egg-rejection behavior in birds without the selection pressure of brood parasitism for an extended period of time.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)nb_NO
dc.titleDeficiency in egg rejection in a host species as a response to the absence of brood parasitismnb_NO
dc.typeJournal articlenb_NO
dc.description.versionsubmittedVersionnb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber406-415nb_NO
dc.source.volume26nb_NO
dc.source.journalBehavioral Ecologynb_NO
dc.source.issue2nb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/beheco/aru202
dc.identifier.cristin1162655
dc.relation.projectNorges forskningsråd: 218144nb_NO
dc.description.localcode© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved. This is the authors' manuscript to the article.nb_NO
cristin.unitcode194,66,10,0
cristin.unitnameInstitutt for biologi
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal
cristin.fulltextpreprint
cristin.qualitycode2


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