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dc.contributor.authorGjerde, Kristian Lundby
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-29T09:33:26Z
dc.date.available2017-08-29T09:33:26Z
dc.date.created2017-08-17T13:14:31Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2452187
dc.description.abstractRussia has made increased engagement with Asian countries a declared priority. This ‘turn to the East’, marked by the extravagant APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) summit in Vladivostok in 2012, is driven by both internal considerations (developing Russia’s huge eastern territories) and external ones (perceived shifts in the global balance of economic and political power). Since the events of 2014, with relations with the West deteriorating into confrontation and sanctions, Russian interest in further developing ties with Asia has only increased.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherNorsk utenrikspolitisk instituttnb_NO
dc.relation.ispartofNUPI Policy Brief
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNUPI Policy Brief;
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNUPI Policy Brief;2017-10
dc.rightsNavngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-DelPåSammeVilkår 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/deed.no*
dc.titleRussia’s turn to Asia: Myanmar seen from Moscownb_NO
dc.typeResearch reportnb_NO
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionnb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber4nb_NO
dc.source.issue10nb_NO
dc.identifier.cristin1486946
cristin.unitcode7471,11,0,0
cristin.unitnameRussland, Eurasia og Arktis
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextoriginal


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Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-DelPåSammeVilkår 4.0 Internasjonal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-DelPåSammeVilkår 4.0 Internasjonal