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dc.contributor.authorWyller, Truls Egil
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-13T13:10:24Z
dc.date.available2017-02-13T13:10:24Z
dc.date.created2005-11-17T14:08:45Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationPhilosophy. 2005, 80 (313), 385-394.nb_NO
dc.identifier.issn0031-8191
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2430579
dc.description.abstractIn his ‘pains and Places’ (Philosophy 78, 2003), John Hyman is right that pains are not located in their causes or effects but in the hurting limbs. However, his position may be consonant with Wittgensteinian expressivism or the view that consciousness is the locus of pain: In producing its own parts, a living organism ‘autopoietically’ sustains itself as an activity functionally present in its limbs. It thus supplies the biological basis for pain consciousness as something wholly present in organs that hurt.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressnb_NO
dc.titleThe Place of Pain in Lifenb_NO
dc.typeJournal articlenb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber385-394nb_NO
dc.source.volume80nb_NO
dc.source.journalPhilosophynb_NO
dc.source.issue313nb_NO
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0031819105000355
dc.identifier.cristin405580
dc.description.localcodeCopyright The Royal Institute of Philosophy 2005. This is the authors' accepted and refereed manuscript to the article.nb_NO
cristin.unitcode194,62,70,0
cristin.unitnameInstitutt for filosofi og religionsvitenskap
cristin.ispublishedtrue
cristin.fulltextpostprint
cristin.qualitycode1


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