Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHellstenius, Henrik
dc.contributor.authorQvenild, Morten
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T12:15:15Z
dc.date.available2016-12-20T12:15:15Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2425556
dc.descriptionThe Norwegian Artistic Research Programme - The Norwegian Academy of Music - (2012–2016)nb_NO
dc.description.abstractTowards a (per)sonal topography of grand piano and electronics How can I develop a grand piano with live electronics through iterated development loops in the cognitive technological environment of instrument, music, performance and my poetics? The instrument I am developing, a grand piano with electronic augmentations, are adapted to cater my poetics. This adaptation of the instrument will change the way I compose. The change of composition will change the music. The change of music will change my performances. The change in performative needs will change the instrument, because it needs to do different things. This change in the instrument will show me other poetic perspectives and change my ideas. The change of ideas demands another music and another instrument, because the instrument should cater to my poetics. And so it goes… These are the development loops I am talking about. I have made an augmented grand piano using various music technologies. I call the instrument the HyPer(sonal) Piano, a name derived from the suspected interagency between the extended instrument (HyPer), the personal (my poetics) and the sonal result (music and sound). I use old analogue guitar pedals and my own computer programming side by side, processing the original piano sound. I also take out control signals from the piano keys to drive different sound processes. The sound output of the instrument is deciding colors, patterns and density on a 1x3 meter LED light carpet attached to the grand piano. I sing, yet the sound of my voice is heavily processed, a processing who´s decided by what I am playing on the keys. All sound sources and control signal sources are interconnected, allowing for complex and sometimes incomprehensible situations in the instrument´s mechanisms.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherMorten Qvenildnb_NO
dc.relation.haspartThis text, the albums Personal Piano and the Karman Line and the final concerts at NMH 16-17 August 2016, materialize the artistic research project the HyPer(sonal) Piano. The project has been conducted at the Norwegian Academy of Music (NMH) with support from the Norwegian Artistic Research Programme, from 2012 to 2016.nb_NO
dc.relation.haspartNettside: http://www.mortyq.com/hpp/nb_NO
dc.subjecthyperinstrumenteng
dc.subjectpianoeng
dc.subjectinteragencyeng
dc.subjectmusic technologyeng
dc.subjecttechnology innovationeng
dc.subjectjazzeng
dc.subjectpop musiceng
dc.subjectpersonal pianoeng
dc.subjectdistributed cognitioneng
dc.subjectimprovisationeng
dc.subjectcompositioneng
dc.subjectperformance studieseng
dc.subjectinteractioneng
dc.subjectinterconnectivitiyeng
dc.subjectmemorieseng
dc.subjectaugmentedeng
dc.subjectpaletteeng
dc.subjectsound arteng
dc.subjectsoundeng
dc.subjectsound engineeringeng
dc.subjectmicrophoneseng
dc.titleThe HyPer(sonal) Piano Project : towards a (per)sonal topography of grand piano and electronics [interactive pdf]nb_NO
dc.typeArtistic productionnb_NO
dc.typeResearch reportnb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Humaniora: 000::Musikkvitenskap: 110::Annen musikkvitenskap: 119nb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber160 s.nb_NO
dc.relation.projectThe Norwegian Artistic Research Programme - The Norwegian Academy of Music - (2012–2016)nb_NO


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record