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dc.contributor.authorJordet, Geir
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-14T11:07:08Z
dc.date.issued2009-01
dc.identifierSeksjon for coaching og psykologi / Department of Coaching and Psychology
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sport Sciences. 2009, 27(2), 97-106en
dc.identifier.issn0264-0414
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/170511
dc.descriptionI Brage finner du siste tekst-versjon av artikkelen, og den kan inneholde ubetydelige forskjeller fra forlagets pdf-versjon. Forlagets pdf-versjon finner du på www.informaworld.com: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640410802509144 / In Brage you'll find the final text version of the article, and it may contain insignificant differences from the journal's pdf version. The original publication is available at www.informaworld.com: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640410802509144en
dc.description.abstractI examine why players from some nations appear always to choke in major international soccer penalty shootouts. Based on a model on choking under pressure as a type of self-defeating behaviour (Baumeister, 1997), I hypothesized that highly favourable public appraisals of a team would be linked to displays of escapist self-regulation strategies and inferior performance. I selected the eight most merited European nations, obtained videos from penalty shootouts in two major international tournaments (World Cup and European Championships), and analysed all 200 shots taken by players representing these teams. The results showed significant relationships between team status, self-regulation strategies, and performance. Players from countries that, at the time of the penalty shootout, either had many international club titles or featured many internationally decorated players, spent less time preparing their shots and were less successful from the penalty spot than players from countries with lower public status. England and Spain are used to illustrate these effects, as the data suggest that players from these two countries may have underperformed in previous international soccer tournaments because of high public status and misguided self-regulation strategies.en
dc.format.extent127054 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen
dc.subjectavoidanceen
dc.subjectattentionen
dc.subjectchokingen
dc.subjectfootballen
dc.titleWhy do English players fail in soccer penalty shootouts? A study of team status, self-regulation, and choking under pressureen
dc.typePeer revieweden
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Social science: 200::Social science in sports: 330::Other subjects within physical education: 339en
dc.source.pagenumber97-106en
dc.source.volume27en
dc.source.journalJournal of Sport Sciencesen
dc.source.issue2en


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